Headline News

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  • ... At least 25 more cities are exploring or planning programs in 2014, according to Susan Shaheen, co-director of the Transportation Sustainability Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley...According to a 2012 report led by Shaheen, 58 percent of bike-sharing services are nonprofits that rely on grants, sponsorships or loans to operate. 

    Reporting Texas
  • Once V2V becomes a reality – and no one doubts that it will – it will be vital to have it accepted as quickly and broadly as possible, since any vehicle on the road not V2V-enabled will increase the risk of accidents and decrease the effectiveness of the technology. “We must reach a critical mass of deployment,” says Dave McNamara, president of McNamara Technology Solutions. “That means getting enough sensors on the road and gaining customer acceptance. The question is: Are they willing to pay for the technology?” 

    Telematics Update
  • The U.S. government’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has announced plans to bring vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication to light vehicles to mitigate crashes. But when and how this will happen remains unclear. In the first of a two-part series, Siegfried Mortkowitz investigates. 

    Telematics Update
  • The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is warning Chicago lawmakers against a bill that would put limitations on software-based car services like Uber and Lyft. While the bill currently under consideration could help protect consumers, "certain provisions ... may unnecessarily impede competition in these services without providing any apparent consumer protection benefits," the agency said in staff comments.

    The Hill
  • Climate change and extreme weather could set back decades of improvement in California’s air quality, a new report by the state’s pollution control officers says..."The achievements we've made to date could be put in peril,” said Jack Broadbent, air pollution control officer for the San Francisco Bay Area and president of the association, which represents the 35 air districts throughout the state...The 33-page report also highlights the tremendous progress California has made since decades ago, when choking air pollution shrouded Los Angeles and other cities.

    LA Times
  • THE Keystone XL pipeline is a great political symbol. The proposed 1,700-mile pipeline, which would carry 830,000 barrels daily of carbon-heavy crude from Canada’s Albertaoil sands to Gulf Coast refineries, has galvanized environmental activists, who call it a litmus test for President Obama’s commitment to fighting climate change...Experts say that Mr. Obama’s eventual decision on the pipeline will have a marginal impact on global warming emissions, while those dull-sounding E.P.A. rules and treaty talks will determine his enviromental legacy.

    New York Times
  • The U.S. transportation system, vital to our economic success, has some big problems. The most immediate is that by this summer it will run out of money to reimburse the states for projects they have taken on with the promise of federal funds...The biggest problem, I would contend, is that this huge program, which provides one of the most critical and influential functions of federal government, is almost invisible to the people upon whom it depends — its customers, the taxpayers.

    Atlantic Cities
  • ...The truth is there's no silver bullet. But cities can still do a better job providing mobility than they do now, and they can start by focusing on the "sticks" and "carrots" of transportation. That means improving alternative transportation options on one hand, and creating disincentives to driving alone on the other.

    Atlantic Cities
  • ...(W)hile the target beneficiaries of UberX, Lyft, Sidecar, and other transportation network companies have been young urban dwellers, these services could expand transportation options far more in the opposite market: seniors living in suburban and rural communities who are no longer able to drive...While many urban areas provide sufficient transportation options for seniors, these choices drop precipitously in suburban and rural environments — with few alternatives, public or private, to cover an individual’s mobility needs. 

    Atlantic Cities
  • General Motors, the nation’s largest automaker, said its net income in the first quarter fell about 85 percent because of costs from safety recalls and a one-time charge for Venezuelan currency changes.

    New York Times