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  • ...Uber, the on-demand car service, is the latest company to target the corporate crowd, as the company debuted its Uber For Business initiative on Tuesday morning. The new program is essentially an appeal to professionals who hate dealing with expense accounts. After a company agrees to participate in the program, employees can use Uber’s car service and then bill their rides directly to the companies they work for. 

    New York Times
  • This week, Long Beach put out a request for bids to tear down a stretch of the Terminal Island Freeway, opening up 20 to 30 acres for new park space. Brian Addison at Longbeachize explains why it’s a long time coming and very good news...

    Streetsblog NYC
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    People in Los Angeles and San Francisco often say that the initial links in a proposed north-south system would be "trains to nowhere." People from nowhere weigh in.

    The Atlantic
  • The Senate is set to take up legislation to keep federal highway money flowing to states, with just three days left before the government plans to start slowing down payments. The House passed a $10.8 billion bill last week that would pay for highway and transit aid through the end of May 2015 if transportation spending is maintained at current levels. Under a schedule outlined by Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., the Senate would take up that bill Tuesday.

    AP/SF Chronicle
  •  In the seesaw battle to build a state-spanning high-speed rail line, Gov. Jerry Brown and other backers of the $68 billion system won a modest victory. A state appeals court has blessed environmental studies needed to run the bullet train through the Pacheco Pass connecting the Bay Area and Central Valley.

    SF Chronicle
  • Back in February, as San Francisco city officials were considering adopting a Vision Zero program to combat the increasing number of fatal collisions involving pedestrians, a car struck and killed an 87-year-old man in a Yorba Street crosswalk on dangerous Sunset Boulevard.

    SF Chronicle
  • zzCopenhagenwheel.jpg

    On a sunny but brisk spring morning near the Charles River in Cambridge, I took a test ride on the bicycle of the future...The bike I tested was equipped with the Copenhagen Wheel, an electric pedal-assist motor fully contained in the oversized red hub of an otherwise normal back bicycle wheel. Inside that red hub is a delicately crammed array of computing equipment, sensors, and a three-phase brushless direct current electric motor that can feel the torque of my pedaling and add appropriately scaled assistance.

    CityLab
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    Call it the 21st-century version of hitchhiking: BlaBlaCar is a peer-to-peer marketplace for open spots in cars across Europe. Unlike American ride-sharing apps Uber and Lyft, BlaBlaCar caps the price of the ride based on distance and the cost of fuel in that country. The average ride is 200 miles and the average fare is less than $25...Every month, a million people use the service, now operating in 12 countries, to share a car. “What we’re doing is building a massive transport network out of all of these empty seats in cars,” Nicolas Brusson, the COO of BlaBlaCar told Quartz. “There are more seats available between Berlin and Munich in cars, for example, than there are train seats or bus seats.”

    CityLab
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    The heavyweights of American transportation engineering continue to warm up to design guides that prioritize walking, biking, and transit on city streets. On Friday, the Federal Highway Administration made clear that it endorses the National Association of City Transportation Officials’ Urban Street Design Guide, which features street treatments like protected bike lanes that you won’t find in the old engineering “bibles.”

    Streetsblog USA
  • The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday it is proposing a $12 million civil fine against Southwest Airlines for failing to comply in three separate cases with safety regulations related to repairs on Boeing 737 jetliners.

    AP/New York Times