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  • The Bay Area Metropolitan Transportation Commission approved $8.7 million in funding this morning to expand the Bay Area Bicycle Share program to the East Bay in 2015 despite delays in existing expansion plans caused by the bankruptcy of a key business.

    Bay City News Services/Oakland Tribune
  • ...Friday’s announcement comes nearly three years after the first draft EIR was issued in August 2011. On May 6-7, the high-speed rail board will hold a meeting in Fresno to receive public comment and consider whether or not to certify the document and approve the project section.

    Hanford Sentinel
  • Buses are starting to give airlines, trains, and even cars a run for their money. With spiffed up coaches, internet reservations, and often significantly cheaper fares, bus travel is becoming an increasingly popular alternative to flying, taking the train and even driving your own car, according to a new study released Monday. "It's a . . . mode of travel that's really shaking things up,'' says Joseph Schwieterman, director of DePaul University's Chaddick Institute which conducted the study. "The ability to hop on a bus for half the price of the next cheapest option is a game changer.''

    USA Today
  • In January, this column suggested a New Year's resolution that everybody who traverses San Francisco's streets - drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians alike - be more considerate and pay more attention. After all, 21 pedestrians and four bicyclists were killed in San Francisco last year, and scores more were seriously injured.

    SF Chronicle
  • I'm standing in the middle of a five-mile linear park in downtown Seoul called Cheonggyecheon. Around me, children play and laugh beside a man-made gurgling stream, which includes remnants of the natural one that used to run here. This is the new reality created in the mid-2000s, when Seoul tore down an elevated, interstate-style highway built in the late 1960s through the heart of downtown.

    Atlantic Cities
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    Using corn crop residue to make ethanol and other biofuels reduces soil carbon and can generate more greenhouse gases than gasoline, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Climate ChangeThe findings by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln team of researchers cast doubt on whether corn residue can be used to meet federal mandates to ramp up ethanol production and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science Daily
  • While Oakland and San Jose airports are expected to pick up more of the region’s air traffic, San Francisco International Airport continues to forecast growth.

    SF Examiner
  • ...The city's drivers will become lab rats, and each errand or trip to work will become part of a very large experiment. U-M's Transportation Research Institute and the federal and state transportation departments have plans to equip 9,000 cars with wireless communication technology.

    University of Michigan
  • State Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg is proposing a new plan for cap-and-trade proceeds that are collected from the state's biggest polluters. Steinberg, D-Sacramento, wants the majority of those revenues to go toward providing a permanent source of funding for sustainable affordable housing and mass transit, like high-speed rail.

    Public News Service
  • A state appeals court rejected a petition by the California High-Speed Rail Authority, potentially clearing the tracks for a trial over whether the agency's controversial and ambitious bullet-train plan can comply with state law. Three justices with the the 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento issued an order late Tuesday summarily denying the rail agency's March 21 request related to a lawsuit by high-speed rail foes in Kings County.

    Fresno Bee