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  • You're nearing the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge during afternoon rush hour in Marin, stuck in bumper-to-bumper eastbound traffic. You see the car in front of you take the San Quentin exit. Then, as you scan the road ahead, you see that same car re-enter the freeway ahead of you via the onramp.

    Marin Independent Journal
  • ...As a retired critical care nurse, I have spent a lot of time in the back of ambulances. One day I was appalled to see people's behavior on the road toward an ambulance with lights and sirens (Code 3). Contrary to popular opinion, the county does not allow ambulances to start their lights and sirens without a reason, and the crew must report whenever they upgrade their status.

    Mercury News
  • A construction project on the Bay Bridge's western span has been suspended after commuters experienced significant delays on Friday, Caltrans officials announced Sunday. The project was set to replace six expansion joints on the bridge's upper deck and place steel plates on the roadway to accommodate the work, Caltrans spokesman Bob Haus said.

    Contra Costa Times
  • ...A close look at the projects that would be funded by Prop. A shows the overall plan calls for reducing miles of traffic lanes for cars, removing an unknown number of parking spaces and reducing stops on several Muni lines to enable the buses to cross town faster. The biggest chunk — $142 million — would go into new traffic signals, crosswalks and other projects to speed Muni and make it safer to cross the street.

    SF Chronicle
  • Under the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Clean Diesel Rebate program, public and private school bus fleet owners are eligible to apply for funding to replace school buses that have older, dirtier Diesel engines.

    Green Car Congress
  • As we saw firsthand during our nine-month Future of Transportation series, U.S. cities are working toward more balanced mobility systems that offer a range of reliable trip options. But just how many Americans take advantage of these options on a regular basis? It's a tough question to answer with much precision, but it just got a lot easier with a new study from Virginia Tech scholars Ralph Buehler and Andrea Hamre—one of the first of its kind based on a representative national population.

    CityLab
  • ...In sum, delays are a huge dead weight on the economy. In the same study, the FAA found that in 2007, late flights cost the U.S. some $31.2 billion—with more than half that amount footed by passengers. There's also an environmental cost, as long-taxiing planes burn wastefully through fuel. Yet when it comes to controlling the sources of delays, it's tough going. You can't change inclement weather, and most airlines overbook as a policy. Nor can you always predict a last-minute repair or faulty landing—all of which can have a domino effect on other departures and arrivals.

    CityLab
  • ...On Thursday, the New York State attorney general said most Airbnb listings in the city violated zoning and other laws. Officials in California and Pennsylvania recently warned car services like Uber and Lyft that they might be unlawful. And workers’ rights advocates have questioned whether the people who provide these services should receive benefits, spurred by recent reports that some Homejoy house cleaners are homeless.

    New York Times
  • 17Ronon-Obit-master495.jpg

    ...With the blessing of Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, whom he long served as a close aide and adviser, Dr. Ronan engineered the state’s takeover of the Long Island Rail Road and then outmaneuvered Robert Moses, the master builder of highways, bridges and parks, to secure the takeover of the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority and the New York City Transit Authority... So encompassing was Dr. Ronan’s influence and the authority’s scope that critics called it the “Wholly Ronan Empire.”

    New York Times
  • ...The carrier plans to retire the last of the 16 747s in its fleet by 2017, CEO Richard Anderson said during the carrier's third-quarter earnings call Thursday...Delta President Ed Bastian, speaking on the same call as Anderson, said Delta's accelerated phase-out of the 747s comes as the company shifts some of its capacity on trans-Atlantic flights to routes between the USA and Asia.

    USA Today